theme
"The word priceless is only really ever used in connection with two things, with art and with human life. No one ever speaks of a building as being priceless, or a car as being priceless. But human life is priceless, and paintings, they’re the most valuable things we have, we lock them up in fortresses. They’re under armed guard. And you know, there’s a reason for that. When I was in Amsterdam, and was lucky enough to have a tour of the Rijksmuseum after hours, it was very eerie, because at one point the lights blinked out … and the most extraordinary thing, I was standing in front of the wall of Vermeers, and it was as if they all were lit with a different kind of light from within … you realized that these paintings were meant to be seen in candlelight, and that they gave off a light of their own. And you realize why these things have no price."
- "On the idea of ‘priceless’ art", Donna Tartt (via epanistamai)
9 hours ago  •  542  •  via  •  source
#words

John Galliano Autumn/Winter 2009

9 hours ago  •  1154  •  via  •  source
#fashion

jnnu:

Twin Peaks postcards by Paul Willoughby, 2012.

1 day ago  •  11075  •  via  •  source
#twin peaks

gravesandghouls:

Tintype Witches, 1875 (via)

1 day ago  •  2961  •  via  •  source
#photography #halloween

mudwerks:

(via John William Waterhouse - Gather Ye Rosebuds While Ye May [1908] | Gandalf’s Gallery)

1 day ago  •  555  •  via  •  source
#painting

shrinemaidens:

EAST ASIAN MYTHOLOGY MEME:

[2/9] CHINESE GODS AND GODDESSES | MAZU

Mazu [媽祖], also spelt Matsu and Ma-tsu, is the Chinese goddess of the sea who is said to protect fishermen and sailors.

Over 1,000 years ago, a beautiful young girl by the name of Mazu (original name was Lin Mo) was born at the Xianliang Port of Meizhou Bay in Putian, East China’s Fujian Province. Clever, brave and kindhearted, Mazu could forecast the weather and offered medical services to fellow islanders. With her innate weather-forecasting ability, Mazu saved the lives of many fishermen from the menacing typhoons.

Since Mazu encouraged the people to conquer nature and defeat evil, she was much loved and esteemed by the locals. Touched by her kindness and good deeds, the townspeople greatly respected her and eventually deified her as the daughter of the dragon, the Goddess of the Sea and the Holy Mother who could bring them blessings. Unfortunately, Mazu died at the young age of 28. As legend goes, Mazu ascended to heaven and became immortal at Meizhou Bay, located opposite to Xianliang Port.

3 days ago  •  1839  •  via  •  source
#mythology #chinese mythology

It’s not the dying that’s hard. It’s that I have to do it here. The last thing I have to see is you assholes.

3 days ago  •  2400  •  via  •  source
#orange is the new black #Rosa

mydarkenedeyes:

Sureeyapon Sri-ampai

3 days ago  •  5852  •  via  •  source
#photography

sakrogoat:

Gustave Doré - A Midsummer Night’s Dream

5 days ago  •  463  •  via  •  source
#painting

webbgirl34:

thebigsisteryouneveraskedfor:

Gisella Perl was forced to work as a doctor in Auschwitz concentration camp during the holocaust.

She was ordered to report ever pregnant women do the physician Dr. Josef Mengele, who would then use the women for cruel experiments (e.g. vivisections) before killing them.

She saved hundreds of women by performing abortions on them before their pregnancy was discovered, without having access to basic medical supplies. She became known as the “Angel of Auschwitz”.

After being rescued from Bergen-Belsen concentration camp she tried to commit suicide, but survived, recovered and kept working as a gynecologist, delivering more than 3000 babies.

I want to nail this to the forehead of every anti-abortionist who uses the word “Holocaust” when talking about legal abortions.

5 days ago  •  143558  •  via  •  source
#Gisella Perl #history #World War Two #holocaust tw #genocide tw #Absolutely amazing woman
"The truth is, I pretend to be a cynic, but I am really a dreamer who is terrified of wanting something she may never get."
- Joanna Hoffman
(via floatingmemories)
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#words

kylejthompson:

Kyle Thompson - Graveyard Girls (2013)

I’ve been in Tennessee with my friend Marissa Bolen.  Yesterday we planned a huge shoot which involved building a dam, and covering models with flour and milky water.  It was a group effort.  You can see her shots here, you should follow her!

5 days ago  •  54739  •  via  •  source
#photography

vassilias:

India, who are you?

You were supposed to love me, weren’t you?

Stoker (2013)

1 week ago  •  1346  •  via  •  source
#Stoker

gravesandghouls:

31 Days of Halloween pin-ups 9/31 —> Illustration by Enoch Bolles, 1945

1 week ago  •  1419  •  via  •  source
#Illustration #halloween #pin-up

shrinemaidens:

EAST ASIAN MYTHOLOGY MEME:

[8/8] JAPANESE GODS AND GODDESSES | IZANAMI

Izanami (given as 伊弉冉尊), meaning “she who invites”, is seen as a Japanese goddess of the Earth, creation, and death. As the former wife of Izanagi, god of the sky, they represent the creation deities that produced the land masses and mythological figures of Japan.

The first gods summoned two divine beings into existence, the male Izanagi and the female Izanami, and charged them with creating the first land. They descended from the bridge of heaven and made their home on the island. They bore six more islands and many deities. However, Izanami died giving birth to the child Kagu-tsuchi, the god of fire.

Izanagi lamented the death of his wife and undertook a journey to Yomi, the underworld. He searched for Izanami and found her. At first, he could not see her for the shadows hid her appearance. He asked her to return with him. Izanami spat out at him, informing her husband that he was too late: she had already eaten the food of the underworld and was now one with the land of the dead. She could no longer return to the living. The news shocked Izanagi, but he refused to leave her in Yomi. While Izanami was sleeping, he took the comb that bound his long hair and set it alight as a torch. Under the sudden burst of light, he saw the horrid form of the once beautiful and graceful Izanami. She was now a rotting form of flesh with maggots and foul creatures running over her ravaged body. Crying out loud, Izanagi could no longer control his fear and started to run, intending to return to the living and abandon his death-ridden wife.

Izanami woke up, shrieking and indignant, and chased after him. She also sent Raijin, the god of thunder, and shikome (foul women) to hunt for Izanagi and bring him back to Yomi. Izanagi burst out of the entrance and pushed a boulder in the mouth of the Yomotsuhirasaka, the cavern that was the entrance of Yomi. Izanami screamed from behind this impenetrable barricade and told Izanagi that if he left her she would destroy a thousand residents of the living everyday. He furiously replied he would give life to a thousand and five hundred.

1 week ago  •  538  •  via  •  source
#mythology #Japanese mythology